Satellite Tracking

Since most research conducted on marine turtles has been carried out on nesting beaches and well over 90% of a sea turtle’s life is spent in the water — feeding, mating, migrating and doing whatever else a sea turtle does when no one is watching, we are missing important information that can help us better protect sea turtles. In particular, to adequately protect sea turtles in all their habitats, we must learn more about their migratory patterns, their behavior at sea, where their marine habitats are located, how the turtles use these different habitats, and the migration routes turtles travel between habitats. Research into the behavior and life cycle of marine turtles has taught us that these creatures do not generally nest and feed in the same area. We now know that sea turtles are highly migratory, often traveling hundreds or even thousands of miles between the beaches where they lay their eggs and the foraging (feeding) grounds where they spend much of their time at sea.

This is where the technology of satellite telemetry becomes useful and important in protecting sea turtles. Satellite telemetry has advanced to the stage of allowing researchers to track turtles in the open ocean after attaching a Platform Terminal Transmitter (PTT) to the back of a sea turtle. The PTT sends a signal full of information to an orbiting satellite each time the turtle surfaces for air. The satellite re-transmits the data to a receiving station on earth, which researchers can access through their computer. Generally, after about a year the transmitters quit working and fall safely off the turtle.

Follow-up with satellite device is our collaboration with Exeter University Cyprus Bycatch Project

Satellite Tracking

https://my.wildlifecomputers.com/data/map/?id=5cc3516ec820f71437627816

From this link, you can see where the sea turtles that release so far with the satellite device made within the scope of Exeter University Bycatch Project.